Date   

Re: [OE-core] Patchwork & patch handling improvements

Trevor Woerner
 

On 11/26/15 16:00, Paul Eggleton wrote:
I'm also
trying to ensure that the patch validation is generic enough so it can live in
OE-Core, and thus we can easily update and refine it over time in line with the
code itself as well as encourage submitters to use the script on their own
changes before sending.
This all sounds like an improvement and is therefore a step in the right
direction :-)

A while back I had the idea of "porting" the kernel's "checkpatch.pl" to
The Yocto Project (it was around the same time that I was trying to
float the whole "Maintainers File" idea too, since I was also trying to
re-purpose "get-maintainer.pl" as well). About one minute into that
effort I realized the existing *.bb files were all over the place in
terms of the order of statements and the order of the blocks of
statements. At that time I found one recipe style guide from OE, and
another one from The Yocto Project, each of which described a slightly
different preference. So I asked on the mailing list and quickly
discovered that both groups prefer a different style.

I'm not saying this job isn't worth doing, but I am pointing out there's
the potential for feathers to be ruffled on both sides if someone tries
to produce a definitive style guide for recipe files and then enforces
it in an automated way. Since it is the OpenEmbedded Project's job to
provide the recipes for The Yocto Project, I'm guessing this question
needs to be decided by them? If that sounds reasonable, then maybe The
Yocto Project needs to acquiesce to OE's decision?

Instead of cross-posting, maybe this would be a good email for the new
architecture list (CC'ed)?


A performance analysis chronicle

Richard Purdie
 

One thing that bothers me at the moment is how long we spend in
do_configure. I have some new build hardware but sadly whilst having
quite a large parallel capacity, it spends a lot of time at idle and
builds don't seem to do so well on it.

In particular, gettext has caught my attention. Specifically, gettext on
an idle system takes 128s to run do_configure, it takes more like 285s
when run as part of the main build? Why? I've been trying to figure out
what contributes to this. Why is it important? If we could understand
this, we might be able to make "critical path" tasks faster and if we
can do that, overall build times will come down.

My first attempt to look at this was from a scheduling priority level:

BB_TASK_NICE_LEVEL = "5"
BB_TASK_NICE_LEVEL_pn-gettext = "0"
BB_TASK_IONICE_LEVEL = "2.7"
BB_TASK_IONICE_LEVEL_pn-gettext = "2.0"

This did offer some reduction to say 275s but certainly doesn't seem to
be the main issue.

Next, I tried:

WORKDIR_pn-gettext = "/media/build1/poky/build/tmpram/work/i586-poky-linux/gettext/0.19.4-r0"

with a tmpfs at tmpram. Sadly again, whilst this changed things like
do_unpack from 15s to 3s, it made no real difference to the overall
configure time. Since I don't believe the system to be IO bound (the
first 1700 tasks of a 6000 task core-image-sato build execute within 2
minutes) this perhaps isn't surprising.

I also wondered about contention over shared paths like the metadata and
sysroot being mixed in with WORKDIR. I tried a build with tmp/work and
tmp/work-shared on a different physical drive, again with no real
difference in performance.

I decided to get some information from perf, hacking buildstats.bbclass
to do:

pn = d.getVar("PN", True)
if pn == "gettext" and e.task == "do_configure":
parentpid = os.getpid()
pid = os.fork()
if pid == 0:
os.setsid()
pid2 = os.fork()
if pid2 > 0:
os._exit(os.EX_OK)
output = subprocess.check_output("perf record -g -t %s --inherit -o /tmp/configureperf.%s" % (parentpid, parentpid), shell=True)
os._exit(os.EX_OK)

and with this obtained perf records for the build under load and at
idle. I've appended various output from perf report at the end of the
mail. Other than seeing that fork overhead is a significant problem, its
hard to see where the extra time is being spent from that profile data.
If anyone knows perf well and get better information I'm open to ideas.

I also started looking at what the gettext configure test is doing under
strace using simplistic measurements like:

strace -f -s 2048 bitbake gettext-native -c configure 2> gtn.strace

This generates a file around 1GB in size, there are some useful
statistics you can pull from it though:

cat gtn.strace | cut -d ' ' -f 3 | grep '^[a-z]*(' | cut -d '(' -f 1 | sort | uniq -c > gtn.funcs
cat gtn.strace | grep execve | cut -d ' ' -f 3 | grep '^[a-z]*(' | sort | uniq -c > gtn.strace.execs

which show an approximate list of syscalls the task is making along with
counts of the number of calls made. It also shows the commands that are
being execve()'d.

One thing which puzzled me was large numbers of call to
"/usr/bin/print", "/usr/bin/which" and "/usr/bin/file", the latter with
some very odd looking arguments. The former is a perl script, part of
mailcap.

This turns out to be some rouge autoconf macro code which tries to see
if "print X" works in the shell if you're not using bash (my /bin/sh was
dash). It does this at the start of every configure script and the
configure script attempts to reexec itself a few times. This in turn
loads the perl interpreter and the script then calls "which file",
ignores anything other than the return value, it then searches PATH for
file. This is just a complete and utter waste of time, there is a patch
below which simply removes the macro and assumes the shell's "printf" is
sane.

With the above analysis approach, you can show that this worth a couple
of thousand execve() calls (22,000 -> 20,000) and 15,000 stat calls
(333,000 -> 320,000) and knocks around 10-15s off the loaded system
do_configure time, the unloaded system time was worth more like around
3s.

Of the 20,000 execs, 2,300 are "cat", "7100" are "sed", 1,000 are "expr"
and the others look more problematic as being the linker/compiler.

I did try experimenting to see if the cat calls could be replaces with
something else. In autoconf, they are mostly from heredoc usage, e.g.:

m4_define([_AC_DEFINE_UNQUOTED],
[m4_if(m4_bregexp([$1], [\\\|`\|\$(\|\${\|@]), [-1],
[AS_ECHO(["AS_ESCAPE([$1], [""])"]) >>confdefs.h],
[cat >>confdefs.h <<_ACEOF
[$1]
_ACEOF])])

which I found you could replace with:

m4_define([_AC_DEFINE_UNQUOTED],
[m4_if(m4_bregexp([$1], [\\\|`\|\$(\|\${\|@]), [-1],
[AS_ECHO(["AS_ESCAPE([$1], [""])"]) >>confdefs.h],
[while IFS= read -r line || [[ -n "$line" ]]; do
printf '%s\n' "$line"
done >>confdefs.h <<_ACEOF
[$1]
_ACEOF])])

which has the advantage of using shell builtins. I did try other
constructs but couldn't find anything simpler and even in this case, it
was complicated, for example needing the || [ -n $line ] to ensure that
trailing data would be handled correctly and [[ to be quoted correctly,
its not a bashism.

Unfortunately, this is line buffered IO so whilst I could cut 2,000
execve() calls, I added around 300,000 read calls instead. I did try
using -d '' to avoid the EOL delimited, however that internally turns
into single byte reads and 900,000 read calls!

So basically, this optimisation didn't really work. If we could make cat
a shell builtin, it would help but I haven't looked at what that would
entail.

The other thing which did jump out at me from the strace was the number
of PATH searches going on for common utilities. I did wonder about
whether our diverse PATH spanning metadata (the scripts dir), our
sysroot and the main system was somehow causing IO bottlebeck issues. I
tested that above with the separate build drive for workdir however I
also tried a different trick, adding symlinks in the scripts directory
for the most common utils as, cat, chmod, cp, gcc, grep, rm and sed to
the host utils in /bin or /usr/bin (the scripts directory is the first
one listed in PATH). I did also briefly experiment with changing "cat"
to "/bin/cat" but preferred the symlink approach.

The profile shows this saves around 1,200 execve() calls and around
80,000 stat calls (320,000 -> 240,000) and took the do_configure time
under load to 240s so there was a measurable effect, sadly the overall
build time didn't seem much changed however. The non-load case is still
around the 125s mark so this perhaps does give a strong hint that cross
directory IO is contributing to the inflation of the build time under
load.

There are obviously further things which can be looked into from here,
however I thought people may find this story so far interesting and it
might inspire others to start looking more closely at this too!

Cheers,

Richard

Output from "perf report A"

Children Self Command Shared Object Symbol
- 5.41% 0.00% aclocal [unknown] [.] 0x43d6258d4c544155
0x43d6258d4c544155
- 5.08% 0.01% bash [kernel.kallsyms] [k] entry_SYSCALL_64_fastpath
- entry_SYSCALL_64_fastpath
+ 84.05% __libc_fork
+ 3.77% __waitpid
+ 3.05% __GI___libc_write
+ 1.93% __GI___libc_read
+ 1.45% __xstat64
+ 0.91% __open_nocancel
+ 0.68% __brk
+ 0.66% __sigprocmask
+ 0.53% __pipe
+ 3.79% 0.02% bash bash [.] make_child
+ 3.61% 0.01% bash libc-2.21.so [.] __libc_fork
+ 3.49% 3.49% aclocal perl [.] Perl_pp_match
+ 3.49% 0.00% bash [kernel.kallsyms] [k] sys_clone
+ 3.49% 0.00% bash [kernel.kallsyms] [k] _do_fork
+ 3.30% 0.08% bash [kernel.kallsyms] [k] copy_process.part.29
+ 2.85% 0.52% bash [kernel.kallsyms] [k] page_fault
+ 2.80% 0.00% cc1 [unknown] [.] 0000000000000000
+ 2.41% 2.41% aclocal perl [.] Perl_fbm_instr
+ 2.39% 2.38% aclocal perl [.] Perl_re_intuit_start
+ 2.33% 0.01% bash [kernel.kallsyms] [k] do_page_fault
+ 2.31% 0.04% bash [kernel.kallsyms] [k] __do_page_fault
+ 2.23% 0.00% autom4te [unknown] [.] 0000000000000000
+ 2.15% 0.10% bash [kernel.kallsyms] [k] handle_mm_fault
+ 2.06% 0.01% bash [kernel.kallsyms] [k] perf_event_init_task
+ 2.04% 0.01% bash [kernel.kallsyms] [k] inherit_task_group.isra.95.part.96
+ 1.94% 0.01% cc1 [kernel.kallsyms] [k] entry_SYSCALL_64_fastpath
+ 1.93% 0.14% bash [kernel.kallsyms] [k] inherit_event.isra.93
+ 1.71% 0.35% cc1 [kernel.kallsyms] [k] page_fault

Output from "perf diff A B -c ratio"

# Baseline Ratio Shared Object Symbol
# ........ .............. ....................... ...................................................................................
#
16.62% 1.275408 m4 [.] 0x0000000000002090
3.58% 0.934606 perl [.] Perl_pp_match
3.46% 1.039378 perl [.] 0x000000000001ac0e
3.12% 0.740720 cc1 [.] 0x000000000016d946
2.77% 0.949347 perl [.] Perl_fbm_instr
2.74% 0.908970 bash [.] 0x000000000001ed44
2.53% 0.889904 perl [.] Perl_re_intuit_start
1.91% 0.706060 i586-poky-linux-ld [.] 0x0000000000002430
1.89% 0.868389 perl [.] Perl_pp_nextstate
1.82% 1.053153 libc-2.21.so [.] _int_malloc

To see the list sorted by ratio:

"perf diff A B -c ratio -t : | sort -t: -k2,2 -nr | cut -c -100"

# Baseline Ratio Shared Object Symbol
# ........ .............. ....................... ...................................................................................
#
0.00: 107.335521:libpcre.so.3.13.1 :[.] 0x00000000000017e0
0.00: 58.518921:sed :[.] open@plt
0.00: 39.706804:[kernel.kallsyms] :[k] set_next_buddy
0.00: 32.437345:[kernel.kallsyms] :[k] find_busiest_group
0.00: 26.460722:[kernel.kallsyms] :[k] task_numa_fault
0.00: 25.791301:file :[.] 0x0000000000001ed0
0.00: 22.245486:libselinux.so.1 :[.] __fsetlocking@plt
0.00: 20.580930:cc1 :[.] _Z15make_pass_loop2PN3gcc7contextE
0.00: 17.729036:[kernel.kallsyms] :[k] update_sd_lb_stats
0.00: 16.301473:[kernel.kallsyms] :[k] rwsem_down_write_failed
0.00: 16.067699:[kernel.kallsyms] :[k] kernfs_refresh_inode
0.00: 15.090138:[kernel.kallsyms] :[k] seq_printf
0.00: 12.787537:ls :[.] 0x00000000000081d8
0.00: 11.657115:[kernel.kallsyms] :[k] ext4_da_invalidatepage
0.00: 11.656298:bash :[.] unary_test
0.00: 10.775472:[kernel.kallsyms] :[k] security_bprm_secureexec
0.00: 10.573946:[kernel.kallsyms] :[k] __queue_work
0.00: 9.638718:ld-2.21.so :[.] _xstat
0.00: 9.178533:cc1 :[.] _Z10add_paramsPK10param_infom
0.00: 8.937500:[kernel.kallsyms] :[k] cdev_get
0.00: 8.628314:sed :[.] getenv@plt
0.00: 8.618151:perl :[.] Perl_do_trans
0.00: 8.535535:[kernel.kallsyms] :[k] mangle_path
0.00: 8.356976:[kernel.kallsyms] :[k] __delete_from_page_cache
0.00: 8.124628:ld-2.21.so :[.] malloc@plt
0.00: 8.117871:[kernel.kallsyms] :[k] osq_lock
0.00: 7.991028:cc1 :[.] _Z20output_quoted_stringP8_IO_FILEPKc
0.00: 7.814020:[kernel.kallsyms] :[k] ext4_ext_remove_space
0.00: 7.549076:[kernel.kallsyms] :[k] load_balance
0.00: 7.441893:sed :[.] _init

or to see the biggest differences in period:

"perf diff A B -p -c wdiff:1,1 -t : | sort -t: -k3,3 -nr | cut -c -100"

# Baseline Base period Weighted diff Period Shared Object Symbol
# ........ .............. .............. .............. ....................... ...................................................
16.62:30953898486: 8524961890:39478860376:m4 :[.] 0x0000000000002090
1.73:3220644640: 538932468:3759577108:libc-2.21.so :[.] __strcmp_sse2_unaligned
1.49:2768327998: 436920702:3205248700:libc-2.21.so :[.] __memcpy_avx_unaligned
0.80:1499099032: 408223464:1907322496:[kernel.kallsyms] :[k] clear_page_c_e
0.97:1803966092: 323339402:2127305494:libc-2.21.so :[.] strlen
0.54:1006908653: 288332008:1295240661:libc-2.21.so :[.] __strchr_sse2
0.66:1228217319: 266221456:1494438775:[kernel.kallsyms] :[k] copy_page
3.46:6446114974: 253835378:6699950352:perl :[.] 0x000000000001ac0e
1.82:3388135954: 180089205:3568225159:libc-2.21.so :[.] _int_malloc
0.17:325395321: 166763174:492158495:libc-2.21.so :[.] __ctype_b_loc
0.57:1066020098: 162627432:1228647530:[kernel.kallsyms] :[k] filemap_map_pages
0.06:120013915: 140088632:260102547:[kernel.kallsyms] :[k] vma_interval_tree_insert
0.39:730051202: 132370215:862421417:[kernel.kallsyms] :[k] perf_event_alloc
0.55:1015490988: 131035917:1146526905:[kernel.kallsyms] :[k] perf_event_aux_ctx
0.43:793617868: 125666408:919284276:[kernel.kallsyms] :[k] memset_erms
0.74:1383682896: 122935416:1506618312:perl :[.] Perl_regexec_flags
0.83:1546248993: 120309599:1666558592:libc-2.21.so :[.] _IO_getc
0.25:469980070: 118797566:588777636:libc-2.21.so :[.] _dl_addr
0.26:490314628: 110317867:600632495:ld-2.21.so :[.] do_lookup_x
0.45:836227328: 106471933:942699261:perl :[.] Perl_yylex
0.85:1580066629: 103820430:1683887059:libc-2.21.so :[.] _int_free
0.62:1160141971: 101707344:1261849315:[kernel.kallsyms] :[k] unmap_page_range
0.01:19809999: 89831404:109641403:[kernel.kallsyms] :[k] native_queued_spin_lock_slowpath
0.60:1113390363: 86975498:1200365861:perl :[.] Perl_yyparse


Path for autoconf to avoid /usr/bin/print



The check for solaris 'print' causes significant problems on a linux machine
with dash as /bin/sh since it triggers the execution of "print" which on some
linux systems is a perl script which is part of mailcap. Worse, this perl
script calls "which file" and if successful ignores the path file was found
in and just runs "file" without a path. Each exection causes PATH to be searched.

Simply assuming the shell's printf function works cuts out all the fork overhead
and when parallel tasks are running, this overhead appears to be significant.

RP
2015/11/28

Index: autoconf-2.69/lib/m4sugar/m4sh.m4
===================================================================
--- autoconf-2.69.orig/lib/m4sugar/m4sh.m4
+++ autoconf-2.69/lib/m4sugar/m4sh.m4
@@ -1045,40 +1045,8 @@ m4_defun([_AS_ECHO_PREPARE],
[[as_nl='
'
export as_nl
-# Printing a long string crashes Solaris 7 /usr/bin/printf.
-as_echo='\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\'
-as_echo=$as_echo$as_echo$as_echo$as_echo$as_echo
-as_echo=$as_echo$as_echo$as_echo$as_echo$as_echo$as_echo
-# Prefer a ksh shell builtin over an external printf program on Solaris,
-# but without wasting forks for bash or zsh.
-if test -z "$BASH_VERSION$ZSH_VERSION" \
- && (test "X`print -r -- $as_echo`" = "X$as_echo") 2>/dev/null; then
- as_echo='print -r --'
- as_echo_n='print -rn --'
-elif (test "X`printf %s $as_echo`" = "X$as_echo") 2>/dev/null; then
- as_echo='printf %s\n'
- as_echo_n='printf %s'
-else
- if test "X`(/usr/ucb/echo -n -n $as_echo) 2>/dev/null`" = "X-n $as_echo"; then
- as_echo_body='eval /usr/ucb/echo -n "$][1$as_nl"'
- as_echo_n='/usr/ucb/echo -n'
- else
- as_echo_body='eval expr "X$][1" : "X\\(.*\\)"'
- as_echo_n_body='eval
- arg=$][1;
- case $arg in @%:@(
- *"$as_nl"*)
- expr "X$arg" : "X\\(.*\\)$as_nl";
- arg=`expr "X$arg" : ".*$as_nl\\(.*\\)"`;;
- esac;
- expr "X$arg" : "X\\(.*\\)" | tr -d "$as_nl"
- '
- export as_echo_n_body
- as_echo_n='sh -c $as_echo_n_body as_echo'
- fi
- export as_echo_body
- as_echo='sh -c $as_echo_body as_echo'
-fi
+as_echo='printf %s\n'
+as_echo_n='printf %s'
]])# _AS_ECHO_PREPARE


Re: [OE-core] Patchwork & patch handling improvements

Paul Eggleton <paul.eggleton@...>
 

Hi Trevor,

On Mon, 30 Nov 2015 10:19:35 Trevor Woerner wrote:
On 11/26/15 16:00, Paul Eggleton wrote:
I'm also
trying to ensure that the patch validation is generic enough so it can
live in OE-Core, and thus we can easily update and refine it over time in
line with the code itself as well as encourage submitters to use the
script on their own changes before sending.
This all sounds like an improvement and is therefore a step in the right
direction :-)

A while back I had the idea of "porting" the kernel's "checkpatch.pl" to
The Yocto Project (it was around the same time that I was trying to
float the whole "Maintainers File" idea too, since I was also trying to
re-purpose "get-maintainer.pl" as well). About one minute into that
effort I realized the existing *.bb files were all over the place in
terms of the order of statements and the order of the blocks of
statements. At that time I found one recipe style guide from OE, and
another one from The Yocto Project, each of which described a slightly
different preference. So I asked on the mailing list and quickly
discovered that both groups prefer a different style.

I'm not saying this job isn't worth doing, but I am pointing out there's
the potential for feathers to be ruffled on both sides if someone tries
to produce a definitive style guide for recipe files and then enforces
it in an automated way. Since it is the OpenEmbedded Project's job to
provide the recipes for The Yocto Project, I'm guessing this question
needs to be decided by them? If that sounds reasonable, then maybe The
Yocto Project needs to acquiesce to OE's decision?
I don't think there's that much of a division. I don't recall if it was you
that raised it at the time but the issue of having two style guides did get
rectified - I changed the one on the Yocto Project wiki to simply be a link to
the OE style guide in June last year. It certainly didn't come about through a
conscious decision to have a different style.

However there is a minor disagreement over indentation for shell functions
between OE-Core and other layers - this persists because of the backporting
pain a blanket replacement would potentially lead to. As I recall this did get
discussed at the OE TSC level. I think that's one thing we could just not
evaluate (or make an option) until such time as we resolve the difference - and
I do mean to see it resolved at some point in the future.

Instead of cross-posting, maybe this would be a good email for the new
architecture list (CC'ed)?
Perhaps yes; I'm a bit concerned that list still doesn't have that many
subscribers though (currently 28, two of which are the same person).

Cheers,
Paul

--

Paul Eggleton
Intel Open Source Technology Centre


Re: [OE-core] Patchwork & patch handling improvements

Paul Eggleton <paul.eggleton@...>
 

On Tue, 01 Dec 2015 11:47:20 Martin Jansa wrote:
On Tue, Dec 01, 2015 at 07:49:50AM +1300, Paul Eggleton wrote:
Hi Trevor,

On Mon, 30 Nov 2015 10:19:35 Trevor Woerner wrote:
On 11/26/15 16:00, Paul Eggleton wrote:
I'm also
trying to ensure that the patch validation is generic enough so it can
live in OE-Core, and thus we can easily update and refine it over time
in
line with the code itself as well as encourage submitters to use the
script on their own changes before sending.
This all sounds like an improvement and is therefore a step in the right
direction :-)

A while back I had the idea of "porting" the kernel's "checkpatch.pl" to
The Yocto Project (it was around the same time that I was trying to
float the whole "Maintainers File" idea too, since I was also trying to
re-purpose "get-maintainer.pl" as well). About one minute into that
effort I realized the existing *.bb files were all over the place in
terms of the order of statements and the order of the blocks of
statements. At that time I found one recipe style guide from OE, and
another one from The Yocto Project, each of which described a slightly
different preference. So I asked on the mailing list and quickly
discovered that both groups prefer a different style.

I'm not saying this job isn't worth doing, but I am pointing out there's
the potential for feathers to be ruffled on both sides if someone tries
to produce a definitive style guide for recipe files and then enforces
it in an automated way. Since it is the OpenEmbedded Project's job to
provide the recipes for The Yocto Project, I'm guessing this question
needs to be decided by them? If that sounds reasonable, then maybe The
Yocto Project needs to acquiesce to OE's decision?
I don't think there's that much of a division. I don't recall if it was
you
that raised it at the time but the issue of having two style guides did
get
rectified - I changed the one on the Yocto Project wiki to simply be a
link to the OE style guide in June last year. It certainly didn't come
about through a conscious decision to have a different style.

However there is a minor disagreement over indentation for shell functions
between OE-Core and other layers - this persists because of the
backporting
pain a blanket replacement would potentially lead to. As I recall this did
get discussed at the OE TSC level. I think that's one thing we could just
not evaluate (or make an option) until such time as we resolve the
difference - and I do mean to see it resolved at some point in the
future.
Using consistent indentation (4 spaces) at least for new metadata would
be step in right direction.

With the amount of changes which are backported to older releases I
still don't see this "backporting pain" argument. Doing it just before
the release is of course useful, because e.g. now more changes will be
backported to Jethro than to Fido or Dizzy. So having consistent
indentation in Jethro and master would prevent 95% of "backporting
pain". Maybe some Yocto 10.0 will finally get the meaning of
"consistent" indentation.
I agree it's not ideal. I said above, I do want to see it resolved.

Leaving indentation aside for a moment do you have any comments on my
proposal?

Thanks,
Paul

--

Paul Eggleton
Intel Open Source Technology Centre


Re: [OE-core] Patchwork & patch handling improvements

Martin Jansa
 

On Wed, Dec 02, 2015 at 04:01:40PM +1300, Paul Eggleton wrote:
On Tue, 01 Dec 2015 11:47:20 Martin Jansa wrote:
On Tue, Dec 01, 2015 at 07:49:50AM +1300, Paul Eggleton wrote:
Hi Trevor,

On Mon, 30 Nov 2015 10:19:35 Trevor Woerner wrote:
On 11/26/15 16:00, Paul Eggleton wrote:
I'm also
trying to ensure that the patch validation is generic enough so it can
live in OE-Core, and thus we can easily update and refine it over time
in
line with the code itself as well as encourage submitters to use the
script on their own changes before sending.
This all sounds like an improvement and is therefore a step in the right
direction :-)

A while back I had the idea of "porting" the kernel's "checkpatch.pl" to
The Yocto Project (it was around the same time that I was trying to
float the whole "Maintainers File" idea too, since I was also trying to
re-purpose "get-maintainer.pl" as well). About one minute into that
effort I realized the existing *.bb files were all over the place in
terms of the order of statements and the order of the blocks of
statements. At that time I found one recipe style guide from OE, and
another one from The Yocto Project, each of which described a slightly
different preference. So I asked on the mailing list and quickly
discovered that both groups prefer a different style.

I'm not saying this job isn't worth doing, but I am pointing out there's
the potential for feathers to be ruffled on both sides if someone tries
to produce a definitive style guide for recipe files and then enforces
it in an automated way. Since it is the OpenEmbedded Project's job to
provide the recipes for The Yocto Project, I'm guessing this question
needs to be decided by them? If that sounds reasonable, then maybe The
Yocto Project needs to acquiesce to OE's decision?
I don't think there's that much of a division. I don't recall if it was
you
that raised it at the time but the issue of having two style guides did
get
rectified - I changed the one on the Yocto Project wiki to simply be a
link to the OE style guide in June last year. It certainly didn't come
about through a conscious decision to have a different style.

However there is a minor disagreement over indentation for shell functions
between OE-Core and other layers - this persists because of the
backporting
pain a blanket replacement would potentially lead to. As I recall this did
get discussed at the OE TSC level. I think that's one thing we could just
not evaluate (or make an option) until such time as we resolve the
difference - and I do mean to see it resolved at some point in the
future.
Using consistent indentation (4 spaces) at least for new metadata would
be step in right direction.

With the amount of changes which are backported to older releases I
still don't see this "backporting pain" argument. Doing it just before
the release is of course useful, because e.g. now more changes will be
backported to Jethro than to Fido or Dizzy. So having consistent
indentation in Jethro and master would prevent 95% of "backporting
pain". Maybe some Yocto 10.0 will finally get the meaning of
"consistent" indentation.
I agree it's not ideal. I said above, I do want to see it resolved.

Leaving indentation aside for a moment do you have any comments on my
proposal?
I'm not familiar with FDO fork, so I don't know how it looks and
behaves, but any improvement on patchwork side is definitely welcome and
I appreciate it.

Does it support e.g. moving the patches to given bundle based on some
substring in subject? To sort e.g. meta-networking, meta-java,
meta-browser, .. patches automatically?

I don't expect FDO fork to provide other features I'm used to from
gerrit like cherry-picking to selected branch from the UI or doing the
review there. But still if we're stuck with patchwork forever (because
some people hate gerrit), then any improvement is really appreciated,
thanks for looking into it.

My only concern is about migrating current database, do you know if the
migration will keep the database including bundles as they are or do you
plan to set FDO version in parallel at least for some transition period?
Currently I have many patches in flight, because jenkins is running full
test-dependencies job for last 11 and based on progress it will take
14-21 more days to finish.

Regards,

--
Martin 'JaMa' Jansa jabber: Martin.Jansa@...


Re: [OE-core] Patchwork & patch handling improvements

Richard Purdie
 

On Mon, 2015-11-30 at 10:19 -0500, Trevor Woerner wrote:
On 11/26/15 16:00, Paul Eggleton wrote:
I'm also
trying to ensure that the patch validation is generic enough so it can live in
OE-Core, and thus we can easily update and refine it over time in line with the
code itself as well as encourage submitters to use the script on their own
changes before sending.
This all sounds like an improvement and is therefore a step in the right
direction :-)

A while back I had the idea of "porting" the kernel's "checkpatch.pl" to
The Yocto Project (it was around the same time that I was trying to
float the whole "Maintainers File" idea too, since I was also trying to
re-purpose "get-maintainer.pl" as well). About one minute into that
effort I realized the existing *.bb files were all over the place in
terms of the order of statements and the order of the blocks of
statements. At that time I found one recipe style guide from OE, and
another one from The Yocto Project, each of which described a slightly
different preference. So I asked on the mailing list and quickly
discovered that both groups prefer a different style.

I'm not saying this job isn't worth doing, but I am pointing out there's
the potential for feathers to be ruffled on both sides if someone tries
to produce a definitive style guide for recipe files and then enforces
it in an automated way. Since it is the OpenEmbedded Project's job to
provide the recipes for The Yocto Project, I'm guessing this question
needs to be decided by them? If that sounds reasonable, then maybe The
Yocto Project needs to acquiesce to OE's decision?

Instead of cross-posting, maybe this would be a good email for the new
architecture list (CC'ed)?
I think the areas where there are disagreements are comparatively small,
really just on shell whitespace. Where they do exist, they are
problematic, not least as some layers effectively ignored an agreement
made by the TSC simply because they didn't agree with it. It basically
means the OE TSC only applies to OE-Core as far as I can tell, which is
sad but is the decision that was made. This also means the TSC has no
real influence over any proposed coding style being used outside
OE-Core.

I do still believe shell whitespace changes would cause significant
patch compatibility issues, I know I disagree on Martin over that. I
still don't like the idea of people blindly running a formatting script
since we'll than start seeing patches every time there is a single space
in the wrong place. We simply don't want that amount of churn on the
metadata.

I can imagine several people replying and saying that patch churn is not
an issue but having seen the things people send patches for, I believe
it will be. I don't want to encourage such things as I believe there are
better things to do with our time (mine included as I'd have to review
them, even to just say 'no').

The maintainers file is a different problem and its one of maintenance,
and more specifically what being listed means, who can be listed, how
that listing can be changed and so on. The Yocto Project has some notion
of maintainer and there its easy, Ross and I can made decisions on who
is listed and what those people are expected to do and we can make it
work (its how we ensure things get upgraded with some regularity). For
OE, who would do this and what would the maintainer file mean? If
someone patches something, are they required to cc the maintainer on
patches for example? (that would imply workflow overhead) What if they
don't cc a maintainer? Should we be forced to revert such a patch?

In many ways its like the "what is a stable branch?" question. Some
people want to use a maintainers file as a way of having a veto on
certain patches. Others want to use it as a way of finding people to fix
bugs. Others again want it to help review patches. The uses vary and you
need a clear definition about what its being used for to make it work.

If someone wants to put together a proposal about which problem this
solves, with clear definitions/charter about how it would all work,
great, but I've seen a lot of problems with such files and I worry it
creates more problems than it would solve.

Cheers,

Richard


Re: [OE-core] Patchwork & patch handling improvements

Barros Pena, Belen <belen.barros.pena@...>
 

On 02/12/2015 08:17, "openembedded-core-bounces@... on
behalf of Martin Jansa" <openembedded-core-bounces@...
on behalf of martin.jansa@...> wrote:

On Wed, Dec 02, 2015 at 04:01:40PM +1300, Paul Eggleton wrote:
On Tue, 01 Dec 2015 11:47:20 Martin Jansa wrote:
On Tue, Dec 01, 2015 at 07:49:50AM +1300, Paul Eggleton wrote:
Hi Trevor,

On Mon, 30 Nov 2015 10:19:35 Trevor Woerner wrote:
On 11/26/15 16:00, Paul Eggleton wrote:
I'm also
trying to ensure that the patch validation is generic enough so
it can
live in OE-Core, and thus we can easily update and refine it
over time
in
line with the code itself as well as encourage submitters to
use the
script on their own changes before sending.
This all sounds like an improvement and is therefore a step in
the right
direction :-)

A while back I had the idea of "porting" the kernel's
"checkpatch.pl" to
The Yocto Project (it was around the same time that I was trying
to
float the whole "Maintainers File" idea too, since I was also
trying to
re-purpose "get-maintainer.pl" as well). About one minute into
that
effort I realized the existing *.bb files were all over the place
in
terms of the order of statements and the order of the blocks of
statements. At that time I found one recipe style guide from OE,
and
another one from The Yocto Project, each of which described a
slightly
different preference. So I asked on the mailing list and quickly
discovered that both groups prefer a different style.

I'm not saying this job isn't worth doing, but I am pointing out
there's
the potential for feathers to be ruffled on both sides if someone
tries
to produce a definitive style guide for recipe files and then
enforces
it in an automated way. Since it is the OpenEmbedded Project's
job to
provide the recipes for The Yocto Project, I'm guessing this
question
needs to be decided by them? If that sounds reasonable, then
maybe The
Yocto Project needs to acquiesce to OE's decision?
I don't think there's that much of a division. I don't recall if it
was
you
that raised it at the time but the issue of having two style guides
did
get
rectified - I changed the one on the Yocto Project wiki to simply
be a
link to the OE style guide in June last year. It certainly didn't
come
about through a conscious decision to have a different style.

However there is a minor disagreement over indentation for shell
functions
between OE-Core and other layers - this persists because of the
backporting
pain a blanket replacement would potentially lead to. As I recall
this did
get discussed at the OE TSC level. I think that's one thing we
could just
not evaluate (or make an option) until such time as we resolve the
difference - and I do mean to see it resolved at some point in the
future.
Using consistent indentation (4 spaces) at least for new metadata
would
be step in right direction.

With the amount of changes which are backported to older releases I
still don't see this "backporting pain" argument. Doing it just before
the release is of course useful, because e.g. now more changes will be
backported to Jethro than to Fido or Dizzy. So having consistent
indentation in Jethro and master would prevent 95% of "backporting
pain". Maybe some Yocto 10.0 will finally get the meaning of
"consistent" indentation.
I agree it's not ideal. I said above, I do want to see it resolved.

Leaving indentation aside for a moment do you have any comments on my
proposal?
I'm not familiar with FDO fork, so I don't know how it looks and
behaves,
This is how it looks like currently

http://patchwork.freedesktop.org/project/intel-gfx/patches/

but any improvement on patchwork side is definitely welcome and
I appreciate it.

Does it support e.g. moving the patches to given bundle based on some
substring in subject? To sort e.g. meta-networking, meta-java,
meta-browser, .. patches automatically?
Mmm, you might not like this, but we are thinking of getting rid of
bundles. Basically, we assumed bundles were a manual way of creating patch
series. The new Patchwork can identify series, so we thought: great!
Bundles no longer needed.

There are other features been considered that might be an alternative to
bundles, like tagging



I don't expect FDO fork to provide other features I'm used to from
gerrit like cherry-picking to selected branch from the UI or doing the
review there. But still if we're stuck with patchwork forever (because
some people hate gerrit), then any improvement is really appreciated,
thanks for looking into it.

My only concern is about migrating current database, do you know if the
migration will keep the database including bundles as they are or do you
plan to set FDO version in parallel at least for some transition period?
Currently I have many patches in flight, because jenkins is running full
test-dependencies job for last 11 and based on progress it will take
14-21 more days to finish.

Regards,

--
Martin 'JaMa' Jansa jabber: Martin.Jansa@...


Re: [OE-core] Patchwork & patch handling improvements

Barros Pena, Belen <belen.barros.pena@...>
 

On 02/12/2015 10:54, "openembedded-core-bounces@... on
behalf of Barros Pena, Belen"
<openembedded-core-bounces@... on behalf of
belen.barros.pena@...> wrote:



On 02/12/2015 08:17, "openembedded-core-bounces@... on
behalf of Martin Jansa" <openembedded-core-bounces@...
on behalf of martin.jansa@...> wrote:

On Wed, Dec 02, 2015 at 04:01:40PM +1300, Paul Eggleton wrote:
On Tue, 01 Dec 2015 11:47:20 Martin Jansa wrote:
On Tue, Dec 01, 2015 at 07:49:50AM +1300, Paul Eggleton wrote:
Hi Trevor,

On Mon, 30 Nov 2015 10:19:35 Trevor Woerner wrote:
On 11/26/15 16:00, Paul Eggleton wrote:
I'm also
trying to ensure that the patch validation is generic enough so
it can
live in OE-Core, and thus we can easily update and refine it
over time
in
line with the code itself as well as encourage submitters to
use the
script on their own changes before sending.
This all sounds like an improvement and is therefore a step in
the right
direction :-)

A while back I had the idea of "porting" the kernel's
"checkpatch.pl" to
The Yocto Project (it was around the same time that I was trying
to
float the whole "Maintainers File" idea too, since I was also
trying to
re-purpose "get-maintainer.pl" as well). About one minute into
that
effort I realized the existing *.bb files were all over the place
in
terms of the order of statements and the order of the blocks of
statements. At that time I found one recipe style guide from OE,
and
another one from The Yocto Project, each of which described a
slightly
different preference. So I asked on the mailing list and quickly
discovered that both groups prefer a different style.

I'm not saying this job isn't worth doing, but I am pointing out
there's
the potential for feathers to be ruffled on both sides if someone
tries
to produce a definitive style guide for recipe files and then
enforces
it in an automated way. Since it is the OpenEmbedded Project's
job to
provide the recipes for The Yocto Project, I'm guessing this
question
needs to be decided by them? If that sounds reasonable, then
maybe The
Yocto Project needs to acquiesce to OE's decision?
I don't think there's that much of a division. I don't recall if it
was
you
that raised it at the time but the issue of having two style guides
did
get
rectified - I changed the one on the Yocto Project wiki to simply
be a
link to the OE style guide in June last year. It certainly didn't
come
about through a conscious decision to have a different style.

However there is a minor disagreement over indentation for shell
functions
between OE-Core and other layers - this persists because of the
backporting
pain a blanket replacement would potentially lead to. As I recall
this did
get discussed at the OE TSC level. I think that's one thing we
could just
not evaluate (or make an option) until such time as we resolve the
difference - and I do mean to see it resolved at some point in the
future.
Using consistent indentation (4 spaces) at least for new metadata
would
be step in right direction.

With the amount of changes which are backported to older releases I
still don't see this "backporting pain" argument. Doing it just
before
the release is of course useful, because e.g. now more changes will
be
backported to Jethro than to Fido or Dizzy. So having consistent
indentation in Jethro and master would prevent 95% of "backporting
pain". Maybe some Yocto 10.0 will finally get the meaning of
"consistent" indentation.
I agree it's not ideal. I said above, I do want to see it resolved.

Leaving indentation aside for a moment do you have any comments on my
proposal?
I'm not familiar with FDO fork, so I don't know how it looks and
behaves,
This is how it looks like currently

http://patchwork.freedesktop.org/project/intel-gfx/patches/

but any improvement on patchwork side is definitely welcome and
I appreciate it.

Does it support e.g. moving the patches to given bundle based on some
substring in subject? To sort e.g. meta-networking, meta-java,
meta-browser, .. patches automatically?
Mmm, you might not like this, but we are thinking of getting rid of
bundles. Basically, we assumed bundles were a manual way of creating patch
series. The new Patchwork can identify series, so we thought: great!
Bundles no longer needed.

There are other features been considered that might be an alternative to
bundles, like tagging
sorry: pressed 'send' too soon :/ As I was saying, tagging

https://github.com/dlespiau/patchwork/issues/36

Or supporting several projects within the same mailing list (in your case,
one per layer)

https://github.com/dlespiau/patchwork/issues/77




I don't expect FDO fork to provide other features I'm used to from
gerrit like cherry-picking to selected branch from the UI or doing the
review there. But still if we're stuck with patchwork forever (because
some people hate gerrit), then any improvement is really appreciated,
thanks for looking into it.

My only concern is about migrating current database, do you know if the
migration will keep the database
I don't know, but I can find out.

including bundles
If we remove the bundles, then I guess the migration might not keep the
bundles.

Belén

as they are or do you
plan to set FDO version in parallel at least for some transition period?
Currently I have many patches in flight, because jenkins is running full
test-dependencies job for last 11 and based on progress it will take
14-21 more days to finish.

Regards,

--
Martin 'JaMa' Jansa jabber: Martin.Jansa@...
--
_______________________________________________
Openembedded-core mailing list
Openembedded-core@...
http://lists.openembedded.org/mailman/listinfo/openembedded-core


Re: [OE-core] Patchwork & patch handling improvements

Philip Balister
 

On 12/02/2015 03:44 AM, Richard Purdie wrote:
On Mon, 2015-11-30 at 10:19 -0500, Trevor Woerner wrote:
On 11/26/15 16:00, Paul Eggleton wrote:
....


I think the areas where there are disagreements are comparatively small,
really just on shell whitespace. Where they do exist, they are
problematic, not least as some layers effectively ignored an agreement
made by the TSC simply because they didn't agree with it. It basically
means the OE TSC only applies to OE-Core as far as I can tell, which is
sad but is the decision that was made. This also means the TSC has no
real influence over any proposed coding style being used outside
OE-Core.
Can you remind us what the whitespace argument is again? I forget, and I
think it is important that everyone understand the details.

Philip

PS: I trimmed the distribution to only the architecture list.


Re: [OE-core] Patchwork & patch handling improvements

Richard Purdie
 

On Wed, 2015-12-02 at 10:20 -0500, Philip Balister wrote:
On 12/02/2015 03:44 AM, Richard Purdie wrote:
On Mon, 2015-11-30 at 10:19 -0500, Trevor Woerner wrote:
On 11/26/15 16:00, Paul Eggleton wrote:
I think the areas where there are disagreements are comparatively small,
really just on shell whitespace. Where they do exist, they are
problematic, not least as some layers effectively ignored an agreement
made by the TSC simply because they didn't agree with it. It basically
means the OE TSC only applies to OE-Core as far as I can tell, which is
sad but is the decision that was made. This also means the TSC has no
real influence over any proposed coding style being used outside
OE-Core.
Can you remind us what the whitespace argument is again? I forget, and I
think it is important that everyone understand the details.
At the time we fixed python functions to use four space indentation and
no tabs. This matches python recommendations and avoided issues with
some version of python which became stricter about whitespace if I
remember rightly, something like that anyway. Regardless, there was a
pressing reason to fix things to one format.

There was a proposal we should standardise shell functions too. One of
our style guides said tabs, one said spaces. Most of OE-Core was tabs.
Rather than change everything, the TSC discussed and agreed to leave as
tabs rather than have patch churn although it was a tough decision and a
lot of discussion. meta-oe standardised on four space indentation for
shell since they believed the TSC to be wrong.

There are clearly arguments either way, not least that editor settings
are easier if its all spaces rather than having to be context aware.

Cheers,

Richard


Re: [OE-core] Patchwork & patch handling improvements

Martin Jansa
 

On Wed, Dec 02, 2015 at 10:59:17AM +0000, Barros Pena, Belen wrote:


On 02/12/2015 10:54, "openembedded-core-bounces@... on
behalf of Barros Pena, Belen"
<openembedded-core-bounces@... on behalf of
belen.barros.pena@...> wrote:



On 02/12/2015 08:17, "openembedded-core-bounces@... on
behalf of Martin Jansa" <openembedded-core-bounces@...
on behalf of martin.jansa@...> wrote:

On Wed, Dec 02, 2015 at 04:01:40PM +1300, Paul Eggleton wrote:
On Tue, 01 Dec 2015 11:47:20 Martin Jansa wrote:
On Tue, Dec 01, 2015 at 07:49:50AM +1300, Paul Eggleton wrote:
Hi Trevor,

On Mon, 30 Nov 2015 10:19:35 Trevor Woerner wrote:
On 11/26/15 16:00, Paul Eggleton wrote:
I'm also
trying to ensure that the patch validation is generic enough so
it can
live in OE-Core, and thus we can easily update and refine it
over time
in
line with the code itself as well as encourage submitters to
use the
script on their own changes before sending.
This all sounds like an improvement and is therefore a step in
the right
direction :-)

A while back I had the idea of "porting" the kernel's
"checkpatch.pl" to
The Yocto Project (it was around the same time that I was trying
to
float the whole "Maintainers File" idea too, since I was also
trying to
re-purpose "get-maintainer.pl" as well). About one minute into
that
effort I realized the existing *.bb files were all over the place
in
terms of the order of statements and the order of the blocks of
statements. At that time I found one recipe style guide from OE,
and
another one from The Yocto Project, each of which described a
slightly
different preference. So I asked on the mailing list and quickly
discovered that both groups prefer a different style.

I'm not saying this job isn't worth doing, but I am pointing out
there's
the potential for feathers to be ruffled on both sides if someone
tries
to produce a definitive style guide for recipe files and then
enforces
it in an automated way. Since it is the OpenEmbedded Project's
job to
provide the recipes for The Yocto Project, I'm guessing this
question
needs to be decided by them? If that sounds reasonable, then
maybe The
Yocto Project needs to acquiesce to OE's decision?
I don't think there's that much of a division. I don't recall if it
was
you
that raised it at the time but the issue of having two style guides
did
get
rectified - I changed the one on the Yocto Project wiki to simply
be a
link to the OE style guide in June last year. It certainly didn't
come
about through a conscious decision to have a different style.

However there is a minor disagreement over indentation for shell
functions
between OE-Core and other layers - this persists because of the
backporting
pain a blanket replacement would potentially lead to. As I recall
this did
get discussed at the OE TSC level. I think that's one thing we
could just
not evaluate (or make an option) until such time as we resolve the
difference - and I do mean to see it resolved at some point in the
future.
Using consistent indentation (4 spaces) at least for new metadata
would
be step in right direction.

With the amount of changes which are backported to older releases I
still don't see this "backporting pain" argument. Doing it just
before
the release is of course useful, because e.g. now more changes will
be
backported to Jethro than to Fido or Dizzy. So having consistent
indentation in Jethro and master would prevent 95% of "backporting
pain". Maybe some Yocto 10.0 will finally get the meaning of
"consistent" indentation.
I agree it's not ideal. I said above, I do want to see it resolved.

Leaving indentation aside for a moment do you have any comments on my
proposal?
I'm not familiar with FDO fork, so I don't know how it looks and
behaves,
This is how it looks like currently

http://patchwork.freedesktop.org/project/intel-gfx/patches/

but any improvement on patchwork side is definitely welcome and
I appreciate it.

Does it support e.g. moving the patches to given bundle based on some
substring in subject? To sort e.g. meta-networking, meta-java,
meta-browser, .. patches automatically?
Mmm, you might not like this, but we are thinking of getting rid of
bundles. Basically, we assumed bundles were a manual way of creating patch
series. The new Patchwork can identify series, so we thought: great!
Bundles no longer needed.

There are other features been considered that might be an alternative to
bundles, like tagging
sorry: pressed 'send' too soon :/ As I was saying, tagging

https://github.com/dlespiau/patchwork/issues/36

Or supporting several projects within the same mailing list (in your case,
one per layer)

https://github.com/dlespiau/patchwork/issues/77




I don't expect FDO fork to provide other features I'm used to from
gerrit like cherry-picking to selected branch from the UI or doing the
review there. But still if we're stuck with patchwork forever (because
some people hate gerrit), then any improvement is really appreciated,
thanks for looking into it.

My only concern is about migrating current database, do you know if the
migration will keep the database
I don't know, but I can find out.

including bundles
If we remove the bundles, then I guess the migration might not keep the
bundles.
OK, then can we please postpone this upgrade (or run both patchworks in
parallel) until these 2 features are implemented and working?

I'm depending on bundles heavily, to "mark" the patches for layers with
dedicated maintainer and also for extra "status" like merged in
"master-next" branch for jenkins build, because standard status values
aren't fine-grained enough.

Regards,

--
Martin 'JaMa' Jansa jabber: Martin.Jansa@...


Re: [OE-core] Patchwork & patch handling improvements

Burton, Ross <ross.burton@...>
 


On 2 December 2015 at 18:04, Martin Jansa <martin.jansa@...> wrote:
I'm depending on bundles heavily, to "mark" the patches for layers with
dedicated maintainer and also for extra "status" like merged in
"master-next" branch for jenkins build, because standard status values
aren't fine-grained enough.

Sounds like instead of bundles the new patchworks needs the ability for a single list to represent multiple projects (so there'd be a meta-oe, meta-python, etc), and more status values.

Ross


Re: [OE-core] Patchwork & patch handling improvements

Tim Orling
 



On Wed, Dec 2, 2015 at 10:43 AM, Burton, Ross <ross.burton@...> wrote:

On 2 December 2015 at 18:04, Martin Jansa <martin.jansa@...> wrote:
I'm depending on bundles heavily, to "mark" the patches for layers with
dedicated maintainer and also for extra "status" like merged in
"master-next" branch for jenkins build, because standard status values
aren't fine-grained enough.

Sounds like instead of bundles the new patchworks needs the ability for a single list to represent multiple projects (so there'd be a meta-oe, meta-python, etc), and more status values.

I agree with Ross that if we can get the functionality we truly need into Patchwork--and JaMa can live with the result or help guide the functionality--that we have a better path into the future.

Also, for what it's worth I vote for spaces only. We can provide editor templates/settings to make it easy on the end users. There are languages that require tabs, there are languages that require spaces. Deal with the required tabs when the necessary evil arises.

--Tim 



Re: [OE-core] Patchwork & patch handling improvements

Philip Balister
 

On 12/02/2015 11:22 AM, Richard Purdie wrote:
On Wed, 2015-12-02 at 10:20 -0500, Philip Balister wrote:
On 12/02/2015 03:44 AM, Richard Purdie wrote:
On Mon, 2015-11-30 at 10:19 -0500, Trevor Woerner wrote:
On 11/26/15 16:00, Paul Eggleton wrote:
I think the areas where there are disagreements are comparatively small,
really just on shell whitespace. Where they do exist, they are
problematic, not least as some layers effectively ignored an agreement
made by the TSC simply because they didn't agree with it. It basically
means the OE TSC only applies to OE-Core as far as I can tell, which is
sad but is the decision that was made. This also means the TSC has no
real influence over any proposed coding style being used outside
OE-Core.
Can you remind us what the whitespace argument is again? I forget, and I
think it is important that everyone understand the details.
At the time we fixed python functions to use four space indentation and
no tabs. This matches python recommendations and avoided issues with
some version of python which became stricter about whitespace if I
remember rightly, something like that anyway. Regardless, there was a
pressing reason to fix things to one format.

There was a proposal we should standardise shell functions too. One of
our style guides said tabs, one said spaces. Most of OE-Core was tabs.
Rather than change everything, the TSC discussed and agreed to leave as
tabs rather than have patch churn although it was a tough decision and a
lot of discussion. meta-oe standardised on four space indentation for
shell since they believed the TSC to be wrong.
Guys, it is 2015 and we are having a discussion about white space. Take
a deep breath.

The underlying issue here is this was brought up with the TSC, since we
need clear guideance for people working on meta-data. The TSC decided to
follow OE-Core. I don't think there is a right or wrong answer here,
just that we need to get our act together and move toward one way of
indenting, so that we provide consistent guidance and people have a
chance of automating processes.

If you are unhappy with TSC decisions, please run for a position.

Philip

PS: Another shitty day in America has depressed me enough to make silly
statement. Gah, no possibly to offensive to some people.


There are clearly arguments either way, not least that editor settings
are easier if its all spaces rather than having to be context aware.

Cheers,

Richard



Re: Patchwork & patch handling improvements

Trevor Woerner
 

Hi Richard,

On 12/02/15 03:44, Richard Purdie wrote:
On Mon, 2015-11-30 at 10:19 -0500, Trevor Woerner wrote:
A while back I had the idea of "porting" the kernel's "checkpatch.pl" to
The Yocto Project (it was around the same time that I was trying to
float the whole "Maintainers File" idea too, since I was also trying to
re-purpose "get-maintainer.pl" as well).
<snip>

The maintainers file is a different problem and its one of maintenance,
and more specifically what being listed means, who can be listed, how
that listing can be changed and so on. The Yocto Project has some notion
of maintainer and there its easy, Ross and I can made decisions on who
is listed and what those people are expected to do and we can make it
work (its how we ensure things get upgraded with some regularity). For
OE, who would do this and what would the maintainer file mean? If
someone patches something, are they required to cc the maintainer on
patches for example? (that would imply workflow overhead) What if they
don't cc a maintainer? Should we be forced to revert such a patch?
I didn't mean to bring up old discussions :-) All I was trying to say is
that one day I had the idea that it would be nice if we had something
similar to the kernel's checkpatch.pl and get-maintainer.pl. In my mind
all I was trying to do was to make it easier for people to:

a) submit good patches (checkpatch.pl) and
b) easier to get people to review patches (get-maintainer.pl).

Sending good patches: I went looking for a concise description of the
accepted recipe file format, poked around on the mailing list and on the
web, then found the two camps who had their own styles. In the end I
gave up on this. I'm excited about Paul's proposal and hopes it goes
well. Maybe we can convince people to put this script in their
~/.gitconfig's so it gets called automatically!

On reviewing patches: the kernel's get-maintainer script uses a bunch of
sources to try to put together a list of people who might be interested
in your patch (which can be used as a CC list for your email
submission). First off it looks for a MAINTAINERS file, parses it, and
figures out the people who are signed up for whatever things your patch
affects. Secondly, it looks at the exact lines of whatever files your
patch touches and looks through the revision history for those lines to
see who last touched them. It then concatenates these two groups
together and suggests these people as possible CC's when you email your
patch.

Personally I have my ~/.gitconfig configured such that this happens
automatically every time I invoke "git send-email". All I do is "git
send-email --identity=<repository> <patches...>" and my own
"get_oe_maintainers.pl" script gets invoked via the "cccmd" option. Then
my patch gets sent to the correct mailing list and also to the list of
people who are most likely to be interested in reviewing it.

I had never thought of, heard of, or considered the possibility that a
MAINTAINERS file could be meant for anything other than as input to the
get-list-of-cc-people script :-) And frankly, my get_oe_maintainers.pl
script runs perfectly fine without a MAINTAINERS file. It's just that
sometimes the maintainer isn't actually the person who last touched
whatever part of whatever file you're patching, and the script isn't
psychic (yet) ;-)


OEDAM at ELC?

Trevor Woerner
 

Hi,

Now that registration is open for ELC, it would be a good time to find
out if there are any plans for any post-ELC activities?

Best regards,
Trevor


Re: [OE-core] Patchwork & patch handling improvements

Barros Pena, Belen <belen.barros.pena@...>
 

On 02/12/2015 18:43, "Burton, Ross" <ross.burton@...> wrote:


On 2 December 2015 at 18:04, Martin Jansa
<martin.jansa@...> wrote:

I'm depending on bundles heavily, to "mark" the patches for layers with
dedicated maintainer and also for extra "status" like merged in
"master-next" branch for jenkins build, because standard status values
aren't fine-grained enough.




Sounds like instead of bundles the new patchworks needs the ability for a
single list to represent multiple projects (so there'd be a meta-oe,
meta-python, etc),
That's already in place

https://github.com/dlespiau/patchwork/issues/15

and more status values.
You can add status values (to the db directly or via the Django admin
interface), but they will apply to all projects in the Patchwork instance.
Ideally you should be able to set a list of status values per project I
guess.

Cheers

Belén



Ross


Re: [OE-core] Patchwork & patch handling improvements

Burton, Ross <ross.burton@...>
 

On 3 December 2015 at 11:43, Barros Pena, Belen <belen.barros.pena@...> wrote:
>and more status values.

You can add status values (to the db directly or via the Django admin
interface), but they will apply to all projects in the Patchwork instance.
Ideally you should be able to set a list of status values per project I
guess.

Well it depends on what the extra values are.  Martin, what values do you use?  A "merged in staging" value would be useful for everyone.

Ross


Re: [OE-core] Patchwork & patch handling improvements

Martin Jansa
 

On Thu, Dec 03, 2015 at 12:51:22PM +0000, Burton, Ross wrote:
On 3 December 2015 at 11:43, Barros Pena, Belen <belen.barros.pena@...
wrote:
and more status values.
You can add status values (to the db directly or via the Django admin
interface), but they will apply to all projects in the Patchwork instance.
Ideally you should be able to set a list of status values per project I
guess.
Well it depends on what the extra values are. Martin, what values do you
use? A "merged in staging" value would be useful for everyone.
The list of bundles is in:
http://www.openembedded.org/wiki/Patchwork#Multiple_layers_sharing_the_same_oe_project_on_patchwork

Once the patches are added to correct bundles I mark them as archived to
know which ones were sorted (the main page gets empty).

Advantage of bundles (something similar can probably work with tags) is
that the same patch can be in multiple bundles, e.g. I can include some
change in master-next branch and bundle while also adding it to
meta-networking bundle for Joe to merge it when ready.

--
Martin 'JaMa' Jansa jabber: Martin.Jansa@...


Re: [OE-core] Patchwork & patch handling improvements

Barros Pena, Belen <belen.barros.pena@...>
 

On 03/12/2015 12:51, "Burton, Ross" <ross.burton@...> wrote:

On 3 December 2015 at 11:43, Barros Pena, Belen
<belen.barros.pena@...> wrote:

and more status values.
You can add status values (to the db directly or via the Django admin
interface), but they will apply to all projects in the Patchwork instance.
Ideally you should be able to set a list of status values per project I
guess.




Well it depends on what the extra values are.
Heh, I meant that's how Patchwork works at the moment, independently of
what we do for OE


Martin, what values do you use? A "merged in staging" value would be
useful for everyone.


Ross

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